Sagveien 23C

0459 Oslo

(+47) 40 00 00 43

post@aprilarkitekter.no

2006 – 2008 Jåtten øst B8 - boligprosjekt Read more

APRIL Architects is a design practice founded on enthusiasm and dedication. APRIL takes on all kinds of projects that fall under the architecture profession. In our portfolio we have many prize winning projects and realized works on all scales, from furniture, to buildings and urban plans. APRIL has been involved in teaching, research and contribute in the daily press in Norway and Iceland. The work of APRIL has been published internationally, and their housing projects are presented in several public office's supervisory brochures displaying exemplary practice in Norway.

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  • Simon Scharnweber

    Siyin Pang

    Lene Marie Grennes

    Gunnar Aasen Rogne

    Giambattista Zaccariotto

    Laufey Sigurðardóttir

    Kristin Pedersen

    Hans Kristian Moen

    Olav Fergus Kvalnes

  • Borghildur Indriðadóttir

    Leena Marjamaa

    Astrid Haram

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    Wenche Andreassen

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    Christa Hellesøe-Jensen

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    Åpent brev, publisert i Aftenposten, signert Elton, Claussen og Hembre
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    I regi av Støtteaksjon for bevaring av Y-blokka. APRILs Kjersti Hembre i arrangementskomiteen
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    Pecha Kucha på DogA
    Kjersti Hembre holdt Pecha Kucha-innlegg om Y-blokk-aksjonen, sammen med Hanne Sophie Claussen
  • 09.09
    Slipp de kreative ideene løs! Riving av Y-blokka er vandalisme mot verdens kulturarv
    Kronikk i Dagsavisen, Hanne Sophie Claussen og Kjersti Hembre
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    Y-benk auksjoneres ut
    En av APRILs Y-benker auksjoneres ut i regi av Støtteaksjon for å bevare Y-blokka. (Landet hos Fortidsminneforeningen!)
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    Appell
    Din våte Drøm holder konsert for bevaring av Y-blokka. Appell ved Kjersti Hembre
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    Y-benker på SALT
    Y-benken tegnet av APRIL arkitekter, utplassert i det offentlige rom
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    Folkeaksjon for Y-blokka
    I regi av Støtteaksjon for bevaring av Y-blokka. APRILs Kjersti Hembre i arrangementskomiteen
  • 05.09
    Hot Pot
    APRILs Hot Pot i by-utstillingen på Seoul Biennalen, september til oktober 2017
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    Rammetillatelser
    APRILs tre boligprosjekter med felles atkomstvei fra Bjerkeveien i Oppegård får rammetillatelser
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    Steinneset
    Os kommune inviterer APRIL til parallelloppdrag for Steinneset
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    By-biennalen i Seoul
    APRIL v/ Arna Mathiesen blir invitert å delta i By-biennalen i Seoul i september 2017 med en installasjon
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    APRIL leverte et konkurranseutkast for planlegging av Gufunes i Reykjavik Island
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    APRIL presenterte tre skisseprosjekter (to eneboliger og en tomannsbolig) + en mulighetsstudie for et naboskap i Oppegård-landskapet. Vi gleder oss til neste faser!
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    Nordic Built Cities Challenge
    APRIL gratulerer Dagný Bjarnadóttir, Anders Egbjerg Terp and Gunnlaugur Johnson for et vinnerutkast i Nordic Built Cities Challenge. APRIL var nordisk samarbeidspartner og rådgiver på teamet
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    Løk for strøk
    Løk for Strøk blir til stede i forbindelse med 'åpen gård'-arrangement på Geitmyra matkultursenter for barn, kl. 12-15.
  • 27.04
    Konkurranse
    APRIL er prekvalifisert for en konkurranse om Gufunesområdet i Reykjavik
  • 30.03
    Presentasjon
    APRILs mulighetsstudie i Bossekop presenteres i Alta Rådhus
  • 01.02
    Jåtten Øst
    APRILs prosjekt på Jåtten Øst er presentert i Fylkesmannen i Oslo og Akershus/Akershus fylkeskommunes hefte: Bomiljø Eksempelsamling om livskraftige urbane bomiljø!
  • 01.02
    Spikerverket
    Boligprosjektet vi har tegnet på Spikerverket ble utsolgt, lenge før ferdigstilling
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    Mulighetsstudie
    APRIL prekvalifisert til en mulighetsstudie for utvikling av Bossekop i Alta
  • 29.10
    Foredrag
    Foredrag av Arna Mathiesen på Sapienza Universitetet i Roma, i forbindelse med boka
  • 20.05
    Løk for strøk
    Løk for Strøk lansert på Sagene i Oslo
  • 25.04
    Re-designing the Gap
    APRIL v/ Arna Mathiesen konseptualiserer og organiserer en konferanse på Litteraturhuset- Re-designing the Gap: Urbanization between Formal Institutions and Informal Dynamics, i samarbeid med AHO og Universitetet i Oslo
  • 26.03
    Foredrag
    Arna Mathiesen holder foredrag på Universitetet i Seoul, i forbindelse med bokutgivelse
  • 09.02
    Folkeaksjon for Y-blokka
    I regi av Støtteaksjon for bevaring av Y-blokka. APRILs Kjersti Hembre i arrangementskomiteen
  • 27.11
    Grønne midler
    APRIL mottar grønne midler fra Bydel Sagene
  • 21.10
    Boklansering på Island
  • 08.04
    Presentasjon på DOGA
    Presentasjon og utstilling av parallelloppdrag Vippetangen på DOGA
  • 13.03
    Vippetangen
    Sluttrapport for parallelloppdrag Vippetangen levert
  • 07.11
    FutureBuilt
    APRILs prosjekt Bykubesong blant andre forslag om klimavennlige boliger i FutureBuilt konkurransen - utstilling og informasjonsmøte
  • 24.09
    Oslo Bys Arkitekturpris
    Spikerverket, herunder APRILs boligprosjekt Spikerverket boliger, trinn 1, er nominert til Oslo Bys Arkitekturpris for 2013
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The Hot Pot

2017 2017
Seoul/Oslo

The Hot Pot as Political Arena - an installation for the Seoul Biennale South Korea.

"The Hot Pot" var APRILs bidrag i den første arkitektur- og urbanismebiennalen i Seoul september-november 2017.

The Hot Pot as Political Arena - an installation for the Seoul Biennale South Korea.

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The Hot Pot as Political Arena

Throughout Iceland, and especially in the capital of Reykjavik, one is never far from a "heitur pottur" or hot pot – a public vessel scaled to accommodate only a few people at a time, and filled with hot water fed from easily accessible geothermal reserves. Usually situated within swimming and recreational complexes, hot pots are special moments of physical and social intensity within cities, towns, and landscapes – no matter their context, they stand apart as focal points with a unique cultural significance. They provide literal points of heat and texture in the environment, and they catalyze moments of reflection and communication, relieving dark winter days with intimate moments of warmth. Like a neighborhood pub in other cultures, hot pots draw people from all walks of life, friends and strangers alike, all stripped of their uniforms, together in a beautiful environment of sounds and sense, where eye contact is almost unavoidable. The hot pot is a site of exchange. Interactions that arise include everything from personal rendez-vous to political debates.

The size and shape of the first public hot pot in Reykjavík was inspired by the hot spring on Reykholt farm, where Snorri Sturluson (1179 –1241), a prominent lawmaker and scholar, lived. Snorri’s assassination marked the end of the Icelandic commonwealth and its unique decentralized rule that arose after the settlement of Iceland in the 9th century. We imagine that Snorri soaked in his proto-hot pot for long hours, reflecting and debating with whomever joined him in the extraordinary and intimate space — perfectly scaled by nature for one conversation to unfold between people in a vulnerable state — naked and open to nature, but protected by enclosure and warmth.

The ‘reyk’ of Reykholt and Reykjavík refers to the steam emitting from hot springs. Reykjavík has the largest geothermal heating system in the world, heating buildings as well as hot pots. After the crash, the city of Reykjavik didn’t close down a single hot pot, but fortunately built more of them. The natural heating system, however, is under threat, as the public utility that administers the geothermal reservoirs of the capital area is now also invested in the production of electricity, an industry that has doubled in Iceland since the turn of the century.

Amid rapid urban development and foreign investment/exploitation, the production of electricity from geothermal resources is causing both environmental harm and social detriment. Poorly designed and managed sites compromise drinking reserves and air quality, and Reykjavíkians are subsidizing private energy and engineering companies that strive to greenwash the global aluminum industry. Citizens confront rising prices for heating and electricity, not to mention entrance fees to hot pots. As the veins in the rocks empty, they take hundreds of years to refill with hot water. New and deeper boreholes need to be drilled to fulfill contracts with international corporations who operate smelters around the coast that consume over 80% of the total electricity supply. If the massive drilling continues, it is doubtful that the geothermal reserves of the capital area will last more than 50 years. Reykjavík will lose its natural wonder and, with it, the vibrant culture of the geothermal hot pot. It is a myth that geothermal is renewable – it is not! Yet Reykjavík applied for and won the Nordic Council Nature and Environment Prize in 2014 for “its conscious work on the environmentally friendly use of water and production of district heating and electricity from geothermal energy."

Our installation invites a reflection on the (im)balance between, on the one hand, the harvesting and use of local natural resources and, on the other hand, the practice of trading resources between geo-political entities in the age of globalization. The recent history of an economic meltdown in Iceland and the ongoing global environmental crisis frame our thinking, and our Hot Pot embraces apparently conflicting trajectories: the human scale of togetherness and interconnectedness confronts the almost absurd scale of the stars. As we soak together, lean back and look up to the stars, we contemplate harvesting the far reaches of the universe for resources to save us from our self-destructive waste and irresponsibility, as if another chance will make a difference.

Collaborators on the project were:

Artist Brynja Baldursdóttir

Professor Thomas Forget

and

Film director Harpa Fönn Sigurjónsdóttir, but her film The Hot Tub was a part of the installation.

Vår installasjon, om den varme kildes plass i islandsk urban debattkultur, var plassert i hjertet av utstillingen og fungerte som et samlingspunkt og auditorium for forelesninger i rommet - midt blant installasjoner om urbane fenomener over hele kloden. Vi er glade for å meddele at installasjonen nå befinner seg i APRILs lokaler i Sagveien 23c.

Vi er glade for at prosjektet ble støttet ved den islandske Hönnunarsjóður og det norske Utriksdepartementet/DOGA (stikkmidler).

Se nærmere tekst om verket på engelsk.

The Hot Pot as Political Arena

Throughout Iceland, and especially in the capital of Reykjavik, one is never far from a "heitur pottur" or hot pot – a public vessel scaled to accommodate only a few people at a time, and filled with hot water fed from easily accessible geothermal reserves. Usually situated within swimming and recreational complexes, hot pots are special moments of physical and social intensity within cities, towns, and landscapes – no matter their context, they stand apart as focal points with a unique cultural significance. They provide literal points of heat and texture in the environment, and they catalyze moments of reflection and communication, relieving dark winter days with intimate moments of warmth. Like a neighborhood pub in other cultures, hot pots draw people from all walks of life, friends and strangers alike, all stripped of their uniforms, together in a beautiful environment of sounds and sense, where eye contact is almost unavoidable. The hot pot is a site of exchange. Interactions that arise include everything from personal rendez-vous to political debates.

The size and shape of the first public hot pot in Reykjavík was inspired by the hot spring on Reykholt farm, where Snorri Sturluson (1179 –1241), a prominent lawmaker and scholar, lived. Snorri’s assassination marked the end of the Icelandic commonwealth and its unique decentralized rule that arose after the settlement of Iceland in the 9th century. We imagine that Snorri soaked in his proto-hot pot for long hours, reflecting and debating with whomever joined him in the extraordinary and intimate space — perfectly scaled by nature for one conversation to unfold between people in a vulnerable state — naked and open to nature, but protected by enclosure and warmth.

The ‘reyk’ of Reykholt and Reykjavík refers to the steam emitting from hot springs. Reykjavík has the largest geothermal heating system in the world, heating buildings as well as hot pots. After the crash, the city of Reykjavik didn’t close down a single hot pot, but fortunately built more of them. The natural heating system, however, is under threat, as the public utility that administers the geothermal reservoirs of the capital area is now also invested in the production of electricity, an industry that has doubled in Iceland since the turn of the century.

Amid rapid urban development and foreign investment/exploitation, the production of electricity from geothermal resources is causing both environmental harm and social detriment. Poorly designed and managed sites compromise drinking reserves and air quality, and Reykjavíkians are subsidizing private energy and engineering companies that strive to greenwash the global aluminum industry. Citizens confront rising prices for heating and electricity, not to mention entrance fees to hot pots. As the veins in the rocks empty, they take hundreds of years to refill with hot water. New and deeper boreholes need to be drilled to fulfill contracts with international corporations who operate smelters around the coast that consume over 80% of the total electricity supply. If the massive drilling continues, it is doubtful that the geothermal reserves of the capital area will last more than 50 years. Reykjavík will lose its natural wonder and, with it, the vibrant culture of the geothermal hot pot. It is a myth that geothermal is renewable – it is not! Yet Reykjavík applied for and won the Nordic Council Nature and Environment Prize in 2014 for “its conscious work on the environmentally friendly use of water and production of district heating and electricity from geothermal energy."

Our installation invites a reflection on the (im)balance between, on the one hand, the harvesting and use of local natural resources and, on the other hand, the practice of trading resources between geo-political entities in the age of globalization. The recent history of an economic meltdown in Iceland and the ongoing global environmental crisis frame our thinking, and our Hot Pot embraces apparently conflicting trajectories: the human scale of togetherness and interconnectedness confronts the almost absurd scale of the stars. As we soak together, lean back and look up to the stars, we contemplate harvesting the far reaches of the universe for resources to save us from our self-destructive waste and irresponsibility, as if another chance will make a difference.

Collaborators on the project were:

Artist Brynja Baldursdóttir

Professor Thomas Forget

and

Film director Harpa Fönn Sigurjónsdóttir, but her film The Hot Tub was a part of the installation.

  • Year
    2017 2017
  • Location
    Seoul/Oslo
  • Status
    Completed
  • Client
    The Seoul Biennale
  • Collaborators
    Artist Brynja Baldursdóttir, Professor Thomas Forget and filmmaker Harpa Fönn Sigurjónsdóttir
  • Project manager
    Arna Mathiesen
  • Co-workers
    Kjersti Hembre